Senior Health

Warning Signs of Ovarian Cancer in Seniors

female-doctor

Are you a woman over the age of 60? If so, you could be at greater risk for ovarian cancer than your younger counterparts.

Read More»

Helping Seniors With Time Management Stress

Helping Seniors With Time Management Stress

Trying to plan an outing recently with my mother made me realize an area in which my life approach widely differs from that of my senior parent. When I asked her about going out to lunch, I was met with a litany of all the things crowding her calendar. She said, “I need to concentrate on my appointment with the cardiologist.” This appointment was three weeks off. She then again read her to-do list that was obviously causing her considerable stress. After a similar conversation with my mother-in-law, I understood this state of feeling overwhelmed was not unique to my mother. Her long list of “chores” was also preventing her from putting any enjoyable activities on the calendar.

Read More»

Better Utilization of Nurses Will Benefit Seniors’ Recovery

Better Utilization of Nurses Will Benefit Seniors’ Recovery

It may not be National Nurses Week (that’s in May), but it’s always a good time to acknowledge how crucial nursing is in the welfare of patients. But despite the important function nurses serve in aiding patients’ recovery during hospitalizations, their duties have progressively migrated from that patient-focused role. Asked to assume many more administrative, clerical, and adjunctive tasks, direct patient care time has been considerably reduced. Recently, however, hospitals are making new efforts to better utilize nurses’ skills and redirecting them back to more patient-related time.

Read More»

Alzheimer’s Treatment Focus Shifts to Prevention

Alzheimer’s Treatment Focus Shifts to Prevention

A decisive shift was evident in the scientific world’s approach to Alzheimer’s disease at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Copenhagen earlier this month. The focus of fighting this ravaging disease has become more of a prevention model than treatment of symptoms and effects on the brain.

Read More»

Reducing Seniors’ Reliance on Sleeping Pills

Reducing Seniors’ Reliance on Sleeping Pills

Recently, my first experience with poison ivy caused several sleepless nights, which made the following days not particularly productive. Although with age, I’ve noticed my sleep patterns are more easily disrupted, I also now know I’m at my best after at least seven hours. Coincidentally, seven hours is the number sleep experts have decided is the optimal average for most adults. According to an article in the Wall Street Journal, several newer studies are moving away from the standard seven to nine recommended hours of sleep per night.

Read More»

Older Men on Statin Drugs Exercising Less

Older Men on Statin Drugs Exercising Less

Statins are prescribed to lower cholesterol and close to a third of older adults in the U.S. are regularly taking the drugs. Although there is much discussion and controversy over the side effects and some unintended health impact of statins, they are still a popular choice in the prevention of heart attacks and stroke in seniors. But a recent study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Internal Medicine reports on another concern for older adult men taking statins.

Read More»

Minnesota Ranks Top in Long-Term Care

Minnesota Ranks Top in Long-Term Care

As senior population numbers rapidly rise, the need for quality long-term care also drastically increases. This from the report “Raising Expectations: A State Scorecard on Long-Term Services and Supports for Older Adults, People with Disabilities, and Family Caregivers.” The study, which contains statistics from AARP, the SCAN Foundation and Commonwealth Fund, compares the states’ delivery of long-term services and supports (LTSS) to older adults, disabled adults and family caregivers. The state-by-state evaluation ranked Minnesota at the top.

Read More»

Study Shows Ageism Affects Health More Than Racism or Sexism

ageism is worse than racism or sexism

We know from many studies that the “isms” – racism, sexism, and ageism can have negative psychological and even physical consequences on those experiencing discrimination. But a new study by the Florida State University College of Medicine showed that perceived age and weight discrimination had worse health outcomes for older adults than the perception of racism and sexism. The results of the study, published in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry showed health changes over a four-year period and grew out of research on perceived discrimination related to body weight as a factor in risk of obesity.

Read More»

Negative Social Contact Raises Blood Pressure in Senior Women

negative social contact in senior women raises blood pressure

We’ve all had bad social encounters that cast a negative spell on the entire day. Whether someone is being rude, very critical, or upset with us, it’s difficult not to react emotionally to the situation and take it personally. Although we may tell ourselves not to react and that it shouldn’t affect us so much, negative social contact does impact our psychological state of mind. Recently, new research confirmed that not only do we take a hit emotionally; these interactions actually can affect our health.

Read More»

The Importance of Social Capital for Seniors

seniors-happy-money

Studies show that money does, in fact, make people happier, but only to a certain degree. In fact, researchers at Princeton have put a price on just how much happiness money can buy or, rather, how much money it takes to buy happiness. People’s happiness tends to increase the more money they have, up until they reach an annual salary of $75,000.

After that, additional income won’t make you any happier and, depending on what it takes to earn that income, could actually make you less happy. The moral? Once our basic needs are met, having more “stuff” doesn’t add anything to our lives – except, of course, more stuff.

It also stands to reason that if your basic needs can be met for much less than that, as with many seniors in senior living communities where they pay one price for all their living expenses and even some medical care, you can be just as happy with less money than that $75,000 benchmark.

The Wisdom in Buying Experiences, Not Things
When you use money to buy experiences such as vacations or special events and create memories with loved ones, you can feel happier. But it’s not the money, or even the event that’s making you happy, as much as it is the people you’re with. This is what psychologists call “social capital,” and it’s a very strong argument for moving to a senior community to enjoy your retirement, filled with people that you can connect with and activities that are fun and fulfilling.

These connections with others are what researchers and psychologists call “social capital,” and it’s been proven to reduce some traits of aging, including cognitive decline and depression, and may even improve a person’s overall health.

The True Value of Social Capital
Bryan James, an epidemiologist at the Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center in Chicago, evaluated 1,100 seniors over a 12-year time period and discovered the rate of cognitive decline was 70 percent lower in people with frequent social activity.

According to an article published at Berkeley’s Greater Good website, even when James and his colleagues statistically controlled for health risk factors like smoking seniors who stay socially active have a 43 percent less rate of disability.

Yvonne Michael of the Drexel University School of Public Health in Philadelphia, PA, is another epidemiologist who studies social capital and seniors. She discovered that seniors living in places with high social capital, in areas where you could trust your neighbors and where neighbors helped each other, had greater mobility and improved health. In another study, not limited to seniors, she found that adults in areas of high social capital were more likely to get screened for diseases at the appropriate ages, leading to earlier interventions and improved health.

Can Senior Communities Expand Social Capital?
This research underscores the importance of finding a senior community where you can forge strong social connections, where good health and exercise are a part of the culture, and where you can live well and have your physical and emotional needs met while spending within your means.

Fortunately, senior communities today continue improving their standards and introducing exciting, fulfilling activities that allow seniors to do just that.

SeniorLiving.Net is a free service for families to use that are looking for senior care or senior living for a loved one. Call (877) 345-1706 to speak to your local Care Advisor about senior care providers in your local area.

Page 1 of 812345...Last »